Kachina Names & Meanings

KACHINA DOLL NAMES

GROUPS & MEANINGS

TYPES OF KACHINAS

Kachinas can be grouped according to their purpose. Groups of Kachinas include the following: Ogres, Guards or Warriors, Hunters, Whippers,  Runners, Chiefs, Women or Maidens, Animals, Plants, Dancers, Borrowed and Others.

OGRES  - The Ogres are disciplinary kachinas who come to the villages on First and Second Mesa either during the Powamu Ceremony or immediately thereafter. They arrive to frighten children and keep their behavior under control. Some arrive with baskets on their back to carry children away who have been naughty. They also demand food shortly after their arrival. Each house in the village is visited. There are known to be 8 Ogres, altogether.

  1) Giant Ogre (Chaveyo)  Cheveyo (An ogre Kachina.) May come at any time during the spring months, if Hopi children are particularly bad the Ogre threatens to eat them. He belongs in the "Ogre" group.

2)  Natask (Black Ogre)  The fearsome Nataska always come as a pair. They accompany the Soyoko on their collection trip and usually stand directly behind the member of the crew who is bargaining with the relatives of the children. They make horrible noises, dragging their saws [and knives, or whatever it may be] along the side of the house or on the ground. All the while, they keep up a steady stamping that makes the turtle-shell rattles on their legs sound ominously. They are supposed to be able to eat a child whole; from the very earliest age, the child has heard stories of these monsters - how they would descend on children playing near the village and haul them away to cook and eat. So it is no wonder that the children are petrified at their actual appearance!

3) Ogre Woman - She appears during the Bean Dance on all three Mesas, although in slightly different forms. On First Mesa, her job is to teach discipline to the children, using the long crook to catch them and frighten them.

4) Ogre Soyok'mana  - Soyok'mana is the oldest member of the Ogre Family, a sister to all the family members. She portrays an aggressive, forceful personality, and is very mean in temperament, always threatening the children's lives. She carries a large burden basket on her back and a long hook for capturing unwary children and placing them in her basket. She is ever threatening to take the children home because they are very naughty children.

5) Sikya Heheya  The Sikya, or yellow, Heheya Katsina dresses in a sheepskin robe over one shoulder and carries a rope to lasso distracted onlookers or to threaten children. Sometimes considered to be an ogre, or a son of the ogres, he sometimes acts as their runner. At Night Dances, he is known to engage in lewd behavior until reprimanded by one of the female ogres. He is wearing chili ristras on his head, his body is painted yellow and his face has distinctive yellow, red and blue stripes.

GUARD or WARRIOR (TUWALAKUM) - These kachinas may be called guards or warriors. When they appear they function more as sergeants-at-arms or policemen. In this role they either enforce actino such as the communal cleanings of springs or as a guard to prevent the approach of anyone interupting the ceremony.You will often see them carrying yucca whips or even a weapon such as a bow.

1) Crow Man (Angwus Katsina)  Crow Man is one of the warriors who make war on the clowns during the Plaza Dances or who appear in the Soyohim of late spring. He comes to threaten the clowns for their non-Hopi behavior, appearing again and again until finally he and others who have the same function descend upon the clowns and thoroughly chastize them.

2) Wuyak-kuita (Broadface)  The Broadface Kachina, Wuyak-kuita, is among the guards who prevent any transgression on the path of the Kachinas. Often called the Broadface Whipper Kachina, he carries yucca fronds that he uses frequently, particularly on clowns, who are terrified of him. He is an important figure in the winter Bean Dance procession.

3) Wupamo  Wupamo is both a chief and a guard. He appears as a guard during the Bean Dance, but he may also serve in this same capacity at secret ceremonies in the kivas or assist with the cleaning of the springs by keeping the men on the job. During Powamu he may be seen patrolling the procession to keep the onlookers clear of the route or urging the laggard clowns onward. Moving quickly from place to place, he uses yucca whips to threaten all offenders. Those who wish to be cured of rheumatism can approach him with that portion of their body turned in his direction and he will strike them with several hard blows on the offending parts. The Long-Billed Kachina or Wupamo is a guard. He carries whips to keep every everyone in their proper place. He is usually found during the Powamu procession circling from the sides or swinging in from the rear. He keeps onlookers clear of the procession route and controls the clowns boundaries. Wupamo is also known as a healer. Those who are suffering from any sickness may request aid from him by allowing him to strike whichever body part affected with his whip.

4)  Hilili (Also a Whipper)  Hilili is a guard kachina. He gets his name from the shreaking call he makes.

  5) Warror Maiden (He-e-e or He'wuhti)  He-e-e or He'wuhti may be seen in Powamu celebrations most years, but it is at the Pachavu ceremonies that He-e-e is seen in her most impressive appearance. Many years ago, tradtion says that some Hopis were living outside the main village, and the mother of this household was putting up her daughter's hair. The mother had finished only one side of the hair whorls, the hair on the other side still hanging loosely, when they saw enemies sneaking toward the village. The daughter snatched up a bow, quiver, and arrows from the wall and raced toward the village to warn the people. She then led the defense until the men in the fields could return and rout the enemy. She has been personated ever since as a kachina and always appears with her hair partially up on one side and hanging down on the other. On the back of her head she wears an artificial scalp lock, and she carries the weapons she snatched up so long ago. She still guards the village.

RUNNER or WAWASH
The Wawsh Kachinum are racing kachinas who appear during the spring dances to run with the men of the villages. Usually there is a group of these kachinas at one end of the plaza prancing up and down and making short dashes to get in shape. Ifront of them their lies a starting line. The man who's channged by the kachinas is able to reach the mark before the race begins. When the race begins the others, not participating get their prizes and punishments ready. If the man loses he's whipped with yucca leaves. However, if he should win, he's given piki bread.
     1) Fox - Though the Fox Dancer Kachina doll represents the spirit of the fox, he also appears in mixed Kachina dances as a runner. The design of black and white spots on the figure represents a constellation of the stars. The animals are the Hopis' closest neighbors and are always willing to assist if approached in a proper manner and asked for help. When prayer feathers and a meal are not given, the animals will often withdraw until proper behavior is shown to them. Warrior animals know the ways of danger and can aid men in becoming like them.

   2) Road Runner (Hospoa)  The Road Runner Kachina appears in the Kiva Dances or Mixed Dances. Road Runners are desired for their feathers which are used in making certain kinds of prayer plumes. They may formerly have also been used as guards against which raft. Usually dolls of this kachina are made only on order.

3) Aya (Rattle Runner)  Rattle Runner carries yucca which they use on any racer who loses, to give several hard swats. If, however the man should win, he will be given piki bread.

4) Red Kilt Runner (Palavitkuna)  The Red Kilt runner is destinctive in the color of the kilt that he wears. He carries yucca whips to use on the losersin the race and rewards the winners with pikibread (similar to the Rattle Runner Kachina).

   5) Squash (Patung) The Squash or Patung kachina is a favorite among many collectors and appears primarily on First Mesa as a runner. It is thought that he may have derived from Zuni. He is sometimes depicted with flowers in both hands, but generally appears with a set of yucca whips in one hand. As a "runner," the Patung belongs to a class of kachinas who are not dancers but rather run races with the men and boys of the village. They come in the late spring, either as a group or as individuals, during a pause in a Mixed Dance or Plaza Dance. Usually they will select one end of the Plaza and, assembling there, will endeavor to have an individual race them. If there are many runners, or Wawarus, there will be a great churning about with one or another racing down the length of the Plaza and other prancing up and down to ready themselves for the coming contest. Quite often they will lure some unwary clown into racing and will immediately catch the hapless individual and perpetrate their peculiar form of punishment on him. They quickly tire of this and will gesture or hold up a reward to some young man in the crowd of bystanders. If he accepts, they will allow him about ten feet of space in which he can move about as he pleases. But the minute he leaves the area he runs as if instant disaster were behind him, and it usually is, for some of the punishments are quite unpleasant. Win or lose, he will receive payment with some kind of food from these racers. No one is safe from the oldest man to the youngest boy; all, including white members of the audience can receive the attention of these kachinas. The kachinas are expected to pay for whipping the young men, and this they do by sending water when it is needed for germinating the crops.

   6) Chili Pepper (Tsil)  Chili Pepper (Tsil) is one of the runner or racer Katsinam who challenge men and boys to foot races in which the racer follows in hot pursuit. The winners of the races receive prizes, the losers...well, Tsil forces hot peppers into the losers? mouths or throws mud at them. Tsil has a yellow face and, as with most runner Katsinam, has large round eyes and wears little clothing to allow for free movement.

   7) Sikya Heheya  The Sikya, or yellow, Heheya Katsina dresses in a sheepskin robe over one shoulder and carries a rope to lasso distracted onlookers or to threaten children. Sometimes considered to be an ogre, or a son of the ogres, he sometimes acts as their runner. At Night Dances, he is known to engage in lewd behavior until reprimanded by one of the female ogres. He is wearing chili ristras on his head, his body is painted yellow and his face has distinctive yellow, red and blue stripes.

 

CHIEFS or MONGWI

The Chief kachinas are called such because of their importance to particular Hopi clans. These kachinas have spiritual roles which are akin to that of the Hopi elders. Chief kachinas have a personal interest in the well being of the clan which they are associated with and can only be portrayed in the dances by specific members of the clan.
   1) Wupamo is both a Chief and a guard. He appears as a guard during the Bean Dance, but he may also serve in this same capacity at secret ceremonies in the kivas or assist with the cleaning of the springs by keeping the men on the job. During Powamu he may be seen patrolling the procession to keep the onlookers clear of the route or urging the laggard clowns onward. Moving quickly from place to place, he uses yucca whips to threaten all offenders. Those who wish to be cured of rheumatism can approach him with that portion of their body turned in his direction and he will strike them with several hard blows on the offending parts. The Long-Billed Kachina or Wupamo is a guard. He carries whips to keep every everyone in their proper place. He is usually found during the Powamu procession circling from the sides or swinging in from the rear. He keeps onlookers clear of the procession route and controls the clowns boundaries. Wupamo is also known as a healer. Those who are suffering from any sickness may request aid from him by allowing him to strike whichever body part affected with his whip.

2) Mastop  The Mastop Kachina is the second kachina to appear on Third Mesa. He is not present on Second or First Mesa. These kachinas always arrive in pairs and come bounding out of the northwest on the next to last day of Soyal. As they rush into the village they beat all the dogs that they encounter using the short black and white staff which they carry for that purpose. Leaping about with many antic gestures, they make their way to the Chief Kiva where they talk in disguised voices with the individuals inside and with each other. Then, as though suddenly becoming aware of the females in the audience, they dash madly into a cluster of women and grab their shoulders from behind and they give a series of small hops indicating copulation. Then they return to the kiva and converse for a while before again dashing over to another group of women, repeating the action until nearly every woman present from child to the very oldest has been approached. All women, even the shy ones, do not avoid this embrace as it is a serious fertility rite despite the antic touches, which are never directed toward the women.

  5) Aholi  - Aholi appears on 3rd Mesa in the company of Eototo. It is said he was left behind to fight a rear guard action, and later followed Eototo during a migration trip that ended at 3rd Mesa. Aholi is Eototo's lieutenant. When Eototo places a cloud mark on the ground, Aholi puts the butt of his staff upon it and then swings the staff about calling our: "Ah-holi-i-i-i-". This action is done repeatedly to reinforce Eototo's actions. Aholi is handsome with his blue helmet and staff.

   6) Red Tail Hawk - The Red Tail Hawk Kachina is a Chief Kachina also known as Palakwayo.  He functions both as a hunter and a warrior during the Pachavu Ceremonies on 2nd & 3rd mesas.

BORROWED KACHINAS
These kachinas are borrowed from other pueblos usually for their perceived value of performing useful functions such as bringing rain. During the process of adopting these kachinas they will either cross over intact or they will under go changes more in line with Hopi beliefs and customs.
   1)  Longhair Kachina (Angak'tsina)   Angak'tsina is perhaps the most friendly of the friendly katsinam. He is truly a Hopi Katsina, as indicated by the traditional hair-style worn by Hopi men after their initiation into the priesthood society. Eagle fluffs are worn on the katsina's long hair and beard which represents a cloud burst or rain. They are accompanied by Yellow and/or White Corn Maidens, and their songs carry positive messages for life fulfillment of all life forms.

   2)  Koyemsi (Mudhead)  The Koyemsi, or Mudhead Kachina, is a clown who may be seen in most Hopi ceremonies. Mudhead Kachinas drum, dance, play games with the audience, and may act as announcers for events. They often give prizes or rewards for the races and guessing games they organize. The term "mudhead" comes from their masks which have mud applied to them. Most of the time they accompany other kachina; probably the only time when they do not appear with other personages is during the Night Dances. Koyemsi are usually the ones that play games with the audience to the accompaniment of rollicking tunes. These games are generally guessing games or simple attempts to balance objects of performances of some common act and the rewards are prizes of food or clothing.

   3)  Hemis - The Hemis Kachina, or Jemez Kachina, is one of them. Kachinas are borrowed from other puebloes because they appear particularly effective in bringing rain or in exercising their other attributes. The Hemis Kachina is most often used for the Niman or Home-Going Ceremony when the kachinas leave the Mesas for six months. It is one of the most appropriate kachinas for this farewell, as it is the first kachina to bring mature corn to the people, indicating that the corn crop is assured.

WOMEN or MOMOYAM KACHINAS
The kachina women represent the wives, mothers, and sisters of the kachinas.  While these kachina represent the female sex they are still portrayed by Hopi males with the exception of the Pachavuin Mana which is portrayed by a women. When a kachina is accompanied by a female the female kachina will be named after him. So the female kachina accompanying a Shalako will be named Shalako Mana.
1) Crow Mother (Angwusnasomtaka)  During the Bean Dance Ceremony, the Crow Mother appears at the shrine near the village and begins singing. She is a deity of the Kachina Clan and lives near Chowilawu 40 miles to the North. At sunrise on the 20 day after her marriage to another Kachina, her brother was bringing her back from the groom's home to her own family's home. She received a call from the Hopi people requesting help during the Powamu ceremony. The Crow Mother immediately started on her way without changing from her wedding clothes. That is why she appears at dawn in her wedding garb. She carries a bowl of corn meal in her basket. she goes to the edge of the village and sings a song, her song is a story of the Kachina migration. She is blessed with a prayer feather by the Powamu Chief who takes the corn from her so that she can start her long journey to her home at the base of the San Francisco Peaks. During this time, two other important Kachinas appear from the East. In the lead is Eototo.

   2) Butterfly Maiden (The Palhik)  She appears in dances held in several of the Hopi villages on First, Second and Third Mesas. She is often referred to as one of the "corn grinding maidens," a part they hold in some of the dances. The "Palhik" comes from the custom of the women drinking a very thin gruel as food when they dance during one of the long ceremonial.

   3) Corn Maiden (Corn Mana) The Corn Maiden kachina carries a basket of corn: blue, white, or yellow. Consecrated corn is returned to the women by Kachinas and Corn Maidens. The Kivas are opened by the Corn Maidens and the Kachina who mark the entrance with cornmeal. Corn Maiden kachina traditionally wears half mask, feather beard, and hair arranged in maiden's whorls, woman's costume and maiden's shawl.

   4) White Corn Maiden (Angak chin Mana or Kocha Mana) This personage accompanies the Angak china when he appears and dances. There are usually half to a third as many Manas as Kachinas, dancing in a separate line.

   5)  Zuni Kachina Maiden (HohoMana) The Hohomana is also known as a Zuni Kachina Maiden. This kachina usually has a black mask with white eyes and white zigzag nose. Clothing includes a crow feather ruff, woman's dress, and maiden's shawl. She usually accompanies the Hemis Kachinas at the Niman dance.

6) Warror Maiden (He-e-e or He'wuhti)  He-e-e or He'wuhti may be seen in Powamu celebrations most years, but it is at the Pachavu ceremonies that He-e-e is seen in her most impressive appearance. Many years ago, tradtion says that some Hopis were living outside the main village, and the mother of this household was putting up her daughter's hair. The mother had finished only one side of the hair whorls, the hair on the other side still hanging loosely, when they saw enemies sneaking toward the village. The daughter snatched up a bow, quiver, and arrows from the wall and raced toward the village to warn the people. She then led the defense until the men in the fields could return and rout the enemy. She has been personated ever since as a kachina and always appears with her hair partially up on one side and hanging down on the other. On the back of her head she wears an artificial scalp lock, and she carries the weapons she snatched up so long ago. She still guards the village.

7) Cloud Maiden

ANIMAL KACHINAS (POPKOT
The Animals are the advisors, doctors and assistants of the Hopi. It is through the assistance of the animals that the Hopi have overcome monsters and cured strange diseases. The greatest doctor of them all is the Badger for it is he who knows all of the roots and herbs and how to administer them. The Bear shres in this ability too. The other animals are more, warriors and know the ways of danger so they may aid the men becoming like them.
   1)  Antelope Deer (Chop/ Sowi-ing Kachina)  The Antelope/ Deer Kachina appears in the Plaza Dances either as a group in the Line Dance or as an individual in the Mixed Dance. He, as well as all other herivorous animals, makes the rains come and the grass grow. He usually dances with a cane held in both hands and acompanied by the Wolf Kachina as a side dancer.

   2)  Fox - The Fox Dancer Kachina doll represents the spirit of the fox. He appears in mixed Kachina dances as a runner. The design of black and white spots on the figure represents a constellation of the stars. The animals are the Hopis' closest neighbors and are always willing to assist if approached in a proper manner and asked for help. When prayer feathers and a meal are not given, the animals will often withdraw until proper behavior is shown to them. Warrior animals know the ways of danger and can aid men in becoming like them.

   3)  Mongwu (Great Horned Owl)  The Great Horned Owl Kachina continually scraps with the clowns. When the boisterous clowns enter a plaza, the owl arrives and stands in a corner. He looks on with displeasure. After several more appearances by the clowns, they become even louder and more obnoxious. Each time the owl watches, disapprovingly, and issues stern warnings. At the clowns' last appearance, the Owl and the Warrior Kachinas descend upon the clowns, douse them with water and whip them with yucca fronds. They leave the clowns yowling with remorse.

   4)  Hon (White Bear)  This Kachina represents great strength. Of the Bear Kachinas, the White Bear is the most popular, because of the color contrasts against the white background. This Kachina appears in the dances and opening ceremonies of the Kachina season, which begins in December.

   5)  Turkey (Koyona) This kachina is not often carved. The Turkey Kachina appears with the other birds in the kivas at night or during the Mixed Dances of late spring. He is not a common kachina and seems to be only from First Mesa. The Turkey Kachina appears with the other birds in the kivas at night or during the Mixed Dances of late spring. He is not a common kachina and seems to be only from First Mesa.

   6)  Deer Dancer (Sowi-ingwa)  The Deer Dancer is a social dancer. He helps to ensure that game is plentiful and that sufficient snow comes in the winter to allow a good harvest the following year. This version is from the Laguna Pueblo.

7)  Badger  The Badger was a curing kachina, and is said to have been brought to the Hopi Mesas from a prehistoric village to the North. He has the most skill and power in curing the sick, out of all the medicine Kachinas.

PLANT KACHINAS
The Plant kachinas aid food production and bring rain. Their are several of them, but most of them do the same  tasks.

Squash (Patung) The Squash or Patung kachina is a favorite among many collectors and appears primarily on First Mesa as a runner. It is thought that he may have derived from Zuni. He is sometimes depicted with flowers in both hands, but generally appears with a set of yucca whips in one hand. As a "runner," the Patung belongs to a class of kachinas who are not dancers but rather run races with the men and boys of the village. They come in the late spring, either as a group or as individuals, during a pause in a Mixed Dance or Plaza Dance. Usually they will select one end of the Plaza and, assembling there, will endeavor to have an individual race them. If there are many runners, or Wawarus, there will be a great churning about with one or another racing down the length of the Plaza and other prancing up and down to ready themselves for the coming contest. Quite often they will lure some unwary clown into racing and will immediately catch the hapless individual and perpetrate their peculiar form of punishment on him. They quickly tire of this and will gesture or hold up a reward to some young man in the crowd of bystanders. If he accepts, they will allow him about ten feet of space in which he can move about as he pleases. But the minute he leaves the area he runs as if instant disaster were behind him, and it usually is, for some of the punishments are quite unpleasant. Win or lose, he will receive payment with some kind of food from these racers. No one is safe from the oldest man to the youngest boy; all, including white members of the audience can receive the attention of these kachinas. The kachinas are expected to pay for whipping the young men, and this they do by sending water when it is needed for germinating the crops.

  1) Cocklebur (Pachok'china)

  2)  Peeping Out Man

  3) Rio Grande

  4)Peeping Out Man

WHIPPERS
Whipper Kachinas act as guards and disciplinary Kachinas for the Hopi, If people don't behave, the Whipper Kachinas give out warnings. The second offence is not so forgiving. The victim receives several strikes by the Kachina, using yucca whips.
   1) Wuyak-kuita (Broadface)  The Broadface Kachina, Wuyak-kuita, is among the guards who prevent any transgression on the path of the Kachinas. Often called the Broadface Whipper Kachina, he carries yucca fronds that he uses frequently, particularly on clowns, who are terrified of him. He is an important figure in the winter Bean Dance procession.

   2) Hilili (Whipper)  Hilili is also a guard kachina. He gets his name from the shreaking call he makes.

3) Hu is a whipper kachina, having a black head and body, wearing a fox skin ruff;  its hands handle yucca leaf whips

   4)  The Tungwup Ta-amu Kachina  or Whipper's Uncle Kachina does not appear with the Hu or other Tungwup Kachinas. He is usually seen guarding the Bean Dance Parade. His main function is to be a guard at ceremonies. The Whippers Uncle is unlike the other Whipper Kachinas, in that he is never whipping or punishing children, nor is involved in the  initiation process.

HUNTER KACHINAS
   1)  Siyangephoya (Left Handed Hunter) Siyangephoya, or Left-Handed [Hunter] Kachina, is said by some be be derived from the Hualapai Indians, but other Hopi attribute them to the Chemehuevi. He is left-handed because his gear is reversed, and to draw an arrow from the quiver, he must use his right hand rather than his left, as is normal. This kachina moves with strange bobbings and little mincing steps. Despite his odd behavior, he is supposed to be an excellent hunter. In carvings, he is usually shown with a rabbit at his feet.

   2) Red Tail Hawk - The Red Tail Hawk Kachina is a Chief Kachina also known as Palakwayo.  He functions both as a hunter and a warrior during the Pachavu Ceremonies on 2nd & 3rd mesas

   3) Solstice or Return (Soyal)  - The appearance of Soyal signalled the beginning of a new Kachina season. During his dance, this kachina placed prayer feathers at each kiva. His offerings were meant to open the way for other kachinas to return to the Hopi mesas from the Spirits World. The SOYAL CEREMONY is the second great ceremonial and symbolizes the second phase of Creation at the dawn of life. It accepts and confirms the pattern of life development for the coming year. It is often called Soyalangwul, Establishing Life Anew for All the World. This ceremony helps to turn the sun back toward its summer path and implements the life plan for the year. Activities take place in the kiva and include reverent silence, fasting and humility and eating os sacred foods to achieve spiritual focus. Prayer feathers are prepared by the men for every purpose and placed in homes, villages and around the ancestral homeland in shrine sites.

   4) Buffalo Head

OTHER KACHINAS

Tsitoto (Flower Kachina) is an ancient Kachina who appears on all three mesas in many ceremonies. The many bands of color and the multicolored feathers provide a rainbow like appearance, and he looks like a walking prayer for summer. However, one of his functions seems to be purification. In this role he carries a small bunch of yucca blades and strikes each individual that he meets a rather firm blow whether it be child or adult, Hopi or White. The Kachina appears most often in the Bean Dance.

Velvet Shirt

Eagle - Represents strength and power and is the ruler of the sky and messenger to the heavens

Dawa (Sun Kachina)  The Sun Kachina, Dawa, is a representation of the spirit of the Sun. He sometimes appears with the Early Morning Kachinas (Talavai), welcoming back the sun as it rises above the horizon. The group stands on the house tops and perform their ceremonies. He also appears in several of the winter dance ceremonies.

Zuni Shalako  The Shalako festival of Zuni, which occurs every year at the beginning of December, but sometimes falls near the end of November, is a remarkable sacred drama, enacted in the open for the double purpose of invoking the divine blessing upon certain newly-built houses, and of rendering to the gods of Zuni thanks for the harvests of the year. The exact date of the coming of the Shalako is fixed each year by a formula of the Zuni Bow priests, which traditionally was the 49th day past the tenth full moon, but has been altered to the weekend nearest the 49th day past the tenth full moon.

Kokopelli  The Kokopelli kachina Is one of the most well known, out of all of them. Kokopeli is a fertility deitie. Like most fertility deities, Kokopelli presides over both childbirth and agriculture. He is also a trickster and represents the spirit of music.

Corn Dancer  The corn Kachina is popular, common spirits because corn is a supreme Hopi food. In the dances they participate in, they function to aid corn production.

The Mocking Kachina (Kwikwilyaka) Mocking Kachina is a clown Kachina who gets his name from the stripes on his nose. He has little personality of his own, but mocks every word, sound or gesture of a person who catches his eye. He reflects every action of the unfortunate person whom he decides to mimic with mirror-like accuracy. He becomes so focused on a person in the audience, that nothing will divert his attention. His mocking usually produces great outbursts of laughter from the rest of the audience. He can also be an annoyance to other Kachinas during the dances. The Mocking Kachina is often referred to as a clown...not as a sacred clown, but as a Kachina whose actions are amusing. His purpose is to bring happiness through humor.

Nangasoh (Chasing Star)  Also known as the Planet Kachina, he represents the spirit of the stars and planets. Legend has it that years ago on the reservations, aliens would come to visit the Indian people and give them advice on hunting and reproduction of crops.

Ahote The Blue Ahote (Siky A'hote) Kachina appears to be derived from a Plains Indian of some variety, because he wears a long trailing eagle feather headdress. The kachina appears in the Mixed Dance, and is presumed to be a good hunter. Also appears with yellow body paint.

Morning Singer (Talavai)  The Talavi Kachina is also know/ called the Silent Kachina, although he sings. It comes in pairs during the Bean Dance and stands to one side of the pocession holding it's small spruce tree and bell. It wears the red and white maidens robe which is a characteristic garb for many kachinas that appear in the early morning.

Fringe Mouth (Ka)  Fringe Mouth or Ka is an important figure in the Night Way ceremony and and usually appears with the Ye/ii Talking God and the Humpback Ye/ii (B/ganaskiddy).

Ball Players (Tatacmu)  These ball player Katsinam (Tatacmu) are always two identical players in a very old game of strike ball. Each has hold of a string attached to the ball, jerking and swinging it to keep the other player from striking the ball. Sometimes the Tatacmu appear in the fast parade and infrequently in summer dances with the clowns. In Shungopavi and Kykotsmovi the Tatacum are considered clowns or Piptuka and they challenge the boys to play with them.

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